9565 Weston Road - 2nd flr, Woodbridge, ON L4H3A5, 905-417-5550

By office@drrgoodfellow.com
July 02, 2013
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Welcome, Harper! 

Harper was born to Angie and Frank on April 14, 2013 weighing in at 6 lbs, 14 oz.

On a recent visit to the office with her mom, Harper was overheard asking a patient in the waiting room if she had clicking and popping! Don't you need an Associate, Dr. Goodfellow?! She's a natural. And absolutely gorgeous! 

We are looking forward to many more visits from Angie and Harper.

Harper - 4 weeks old.

 

 

 

(Harper - 4 weeks old)

 

 

 

 

By office
August 01, 2012
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A couple of weeks ago, Dr. Goodfellow fractured his ankle playing hockey. As he now likes to say, “I have more hardware in my leg than a Home Hardware.” Currently unable to drive, his wife, Cathie, has been bringing him to work. You may have seen her in the office – she is the one without any hair.

Cathie has alopecia, which is the medical term for hair loss. Her hair fell out when she was 10 years old and never grew back. Alopecia affects approximately 2% of the population; that is a lot of men and women. But, for many reasons, you rarely see women with alopecia without a wig. Sometimes Cathie wears a wig, but most days she wears a bandana or goes “au naturale” – naked, at least her head!

If you would like more information on alopecia, please feel free to speak with Cathie or Dr. Goodfellow, as they would be happy to talk with you about it, or check out the National Alopecia Areata Foundation (NAAF) website. 

By office
December 22, 2011
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In the age of cell phones, the internet, and 24/7 lifestyles, children are sleeping about an hour less than they did a century ago1. According to Dr. Shelly Weiss2, teenagers are suffering from chronic sleep deprivation. The average teenager sleeps only 7 hours per night (they need 8.5 to 9.5 hours) and doesn’t appear for breakfast until lunchtime on the weekends. However, your teenager probably isn’t the one waking you up in the middle of the night, it is your younger children. All of us, including children, wake up during the night and usually fall back to sleep without trouble. This is just part of our natural, nightly sleep cycle. However, some children wake up in the night and cannot get back to sleep. Why? Dr. Weiss’ talk at the Canadian Chapter of the AACP’s most recent symposium gave me some insight2. (See Nov 27, 2011 blog post for more info on Dr. Weiss.)

For toddlers and preschoolers, a common reason for not being able to go back to sleep when they wake up in the night is due to behavioural insomnia. Children with behavioural insomnia often have difficulty settling at bed time and then wake up during the night and cannot get back to sleep until a parent intervenes. There are two main reasons for this: sleep association and positive reinforcement.

What is sleep association? As an example, if you rocked your child to sleep in your arms then put them to bed, you will need to rock them in your arms again when they wake in the night in order for them to fall back to sleep. Your child will likely not go back to sleep until you recreate the conditions that they associate with falling asleep the first time. So, what can you do? There are many successful strategies to deal with this including, putting your child to bed awake, making sure their room is dark, quiet and comfortable, and sticking to a regular schedule of waking, bedtime and nap time. Some behaviours to avoid at bedtime are rocking your child to sleep in your arms, allowing your child to fall asleep anywhere but their crib/bed, and putting them in a car or stroller to get them to sleep. Remember, anything that you do to get them to sleep at bed time you will have to do again when they wake up in the night, which might not be good for you or for your child.

And positive reinforcement? Simply by going to your child when they wake up in the night you are positively reinforcing this behaviour, giving them the attention they seek. What can you do? Some suggestions are to put your child to bed at a specific bedtime, ignore them until a set time in the morning, ignoring any crying or calling for you, and not let them come and sleep in your bed. If your child is used to you coming in during the night then you can gradually wean them of this habit using a schedule of progressive waiting before checking on them, with brief comforting (15-60 seconds) between wait times (graduated extinction). Of course, monitor your child for illness or injury.

In addition to behavioural insomnia, preschoolers may also suffer from nightmares, night terrors and sleep walking. To help with nightmares, avoid excessive stimulation such as violent television or computer games, keep a regular sleep/wake cycle, and reassure your child that they are safe. If nightmares become frequent, see your doctor.

There are, of course, other causes of children waking up in the night, including rhythmic movement disorder, obstructive sleep apnea, and seizures. For these problems, or any others that are not resolving over time or are causing daytime problems, see your doctor. 

Great information for all of us from Dr. Weiss' talk. For more information on obstructive sleep apnea, take a look at Dr. Goodfellow's sleep apnea link.

1Matricciani L, et al. In search of lost sleep: secular trends in the sleep time of school-aged children and adolescents.Sleep Med Rev. 2011 May 23.

2Weiss, S. Pain or not pain? Evaluating the cause of childhood sleepiness.Canadian Chapter of the AACP , 2011 Symposium.

By office
November 27, 2011
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The 5th annual symposium of the Canadian Chapter of the American Academy of Craniofacial Pain (AACP) was a big success. For more information on the meeting, please check out the Canadian Chapter's website: http://aacpcanada.ca/

If you are a parent with a child who has trouble sleeping, Dr. Shelly Weiss’ talk was very interesting and relevant. Dr. Weiss is a paediatric neurologist at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, the President of the Canadian Sleep Society and author of the book Better Sleep for Your Baby and Child: A Parent's Step-by-Step Guide to Healthy Sleep Habits. The Office Blog’s next post will be all about her talk. Stay tuned.

By office
November 22, 2011
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